During rush hour traffic in Los Angeles Thursday, the city of gridlock got a first look at an electric flying taxi that's part of a movement to shift commuters from the streets to the skies.
Aircraft developer Archer unveiled Maker, an electric " />

Archer reveals its Maker flying taxi, promising to lift us out of traffic hell

Aircraft developer Archer unveiled Maker, an electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft (eVTOL) that can travel 60 miles at a top speed of 150 mph, to a crowd of about 100 people and many more on a livestream at an airport hangar just around the corner from SpaceX. The Maker, which takes off vertically like a helicopter but flies like a plane, is one of many electric aircraft that promise to shake up the transportation industry over the next decade.

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Facebook wants to make an Instagram Youth — but the youth aren’t so sure they want it

People under 13 can’t sign up for Instagram because of federal privacy law, but that doesn’t actually stop most kids from signing up. Lying about your age online is an easy thing to do!

But Instagram says they have come up with a solution — that might also get some other kids interested and engaged at an earlier age. They’re looking into creating a platform called Instagram Youth.

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McDonald’s suffers data breach in the US, South Korea, and Taiwan

The fast food mega chain McDonald’s is the latest company to have private data stolen by a third party, The Wall Street Journal reports. Unlike other recent attacks on CNA Financial and the Colonial Pipeline, McDonald’s claims it isn’t dealing with ransomware, but store information in the US was taken, along with some customer information in South Korea and Taiwan.

The company discovered the data breach after hiring consultants to “investigate unauthorized activity on an internal security system” McDonald’s tells the Journal. In the US, the data accessed included business contact information for franchises, the seating capacity of stores, and the square footage of play areas. The South Korean and Taiwanese arms of McDonald’s “had customer personal data accessed” and the company “will be taking steps to notify regulators and customers listed in these files,” the company tells The Verge. McDonald’s stressed that “no customer payment information was contained in these files.”

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Amazon, eBay fight legislation that would unmask third-party sellers

Amazon and a who’s who of online-only retailers are trying to kill proposed federal and state legislation that would make the companies disclose contact information for third-party sellers.

The bills would force Amazon and others to verify the identities of third-party sellers and provide consumers with ways to contact the stores. The proposed legislation is pitting brick-and-mortar retailers—including Home Depot, Walgreens, and JC Penney, which support the bills—against online retailers like Amazon, Etsy, eBay, Poshmark, and others, which argue that the legislation would harm small sellers.

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Google Chrome ends its war on address bar URLs—for now, at least

Chrome is ending its war on address bar URLs—at least for now. About a year ago, Chrome started experimenting with stripping down the URL shown in the address bar to only the domain name, so instead of something like “https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2020/06/google-is-messing-with-the-address-bar-again-new-experiment-hides-url-path/,” the address bar would show only “arstechnica.com,” and you would have no idea where you are in the site directory.

Android Police spotted a post on the Chromium bug tracker announcing that Google is killing the idea. Back in June 2020 when the experiment was kicking off, Google engineer Emily Stark explained that the company was experimenting with a simplified URL display “to understand if it helps users identify malicious websites more accurately.” It’s a year later, and now Stark writes that the “simplified domain experiment” will be deleted from the codebase, saying, “This experiment didn’t move relevant security metrics, so we’re not going to launch it. :(“

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Twitter may be close to launching Super Follows, as new research shows what it could look like

Twitter announced earlier this year it was working on a Super Follows feature that would allow some users to charge followers and give them access to extra content. On Sunday, app researcher Jane Manchun Wong tweeted screenshots of what she says it will look like.

According to Wong’s research, which is typically very accurate, the Super Follows program will be limited to Twitter users with at least 10,000 followers, who have posted at least 25 tweets within the past 30 days, and are at least 18 years old. As Twitter has referenced, one of the main features of Super Follows will be bonus content, such as exclusive tweets for Super Followers.

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China Has Triggered a Bitcoin Mining Exodus

China has long been the world’s epicenter of bitcoin mining, an energy-guzzling process to secure the cryptocurrency network and mint new bitcoins via specialized machines known as “mining rigs.” According to the University of Cambridge’s Centre for Alternative Finance, over 65 percent of miners working on the bitcoin blockchain were based in China as of April 2021. But Chinese miners are now on tenterhooks following a top government official’s announcement, in a speech on May 21, that Beijing would start to “crackdown on bitcoin mining and trading behavior.”

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