The Cult of the Crispy Geek needs You!

OK so I’ve been doing a little bit of work in the background.  The plan is to try and get a podcast going for the site.  I’ve lined up a few hosts, and we plan to get recording in the first weekend of March.  The plan is to start discussing things that come up on the site either in the forums or on the news feed.

Between now and then, I would like your help.  Anybody who can help by posting in the forums or submitting news for the front page feed is absolutely welcome to and would help us greatly.  This will help us find source material for use on the podcast.

Of course the podcasts will be made available on the site when the time comes.  So watch this space!

Facebook will roll back its block on news posts in Australia

Just a few days after blocking Australian publishers and residents from sharing news content, Facebook has reversed the policy. Initially, Facebook claimed “We will now prioritize investments to other countries, as part of our plans to invest in new licensing news programs and experiences.”

In an update posted today, the company said:

“After further discussions, we are satisfied that the Australian government has agreed to a number of changes and guarantees that address our core concerns about allowing commercial deals that recognize the value our platform provides to publishers relative to the value we receive from them. As a result of these changes, we can now work to further our investment in public interest journalism and restore news on Facebook for Australians in the coming days.”

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Some viewers of Metallica’s BlizzCon performance heard the least metal music imaginable

Despite its later-than-usual timing and going completely virtual for the first time, yesterday’s BlizzCon keynote brought with it some big news and exciting trailers. It also featured a musical performance from Metallica. The band isn’t new to BlizzCon, having first appeared at the conference in 2014.

Viewers on many platforms (including Blizzard’s own Twitch and YouTube channels) heard a performance of Metallica’s 1984 tune “For Whom The Bell Tolls.” Several Twitch streamers broadcasting BlizzCon muted the feed during Metallica’s appearance to avoid any potential DMCA troubles.

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Microsoft says SolarWinds hackers stole source code for 3 products

The hackers behind one of the worst breaches in US history read and downloaded some Microsoft source code, but there’s no evidence they were able to access production servers or customer data, Microsoft said on Thursday. The software maker also said it found no evidence the hackers used the Microsoft compromise to attack customers.

Microsoft released those findings after completing an investigation begun in December, after learning its network had been compromised. The breach was part of a wide-ranging hack that compromised the distribution system for the widely used Orion network-management software from SolarWinds and pushed out malicious updates to Microsoft and roughly 18,000 other customers.

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WhatsApp is having another go at explaining its privacy policy to users

WhatsApp has a new plan to explain its contentious privacy policy — the one that came under fire when users grew concerned the platform would share their messages with parent company Facebook. In an announcement on Thursday, the company explained how users can read through the new policy and learn how business and personal messages — which have different privacy standards — are handled.

The Not Private Private Not Un Data Mining Source

Nvidia says it won’t nerf the Ethereum mining performance of existing GPUs

This morning, Nvidia announced that it would artificially reduce the performance of its upcoming $329 GeForce RTX 3060 graphics card when it comes to one specific task: Ethereum cryptocurrency mining. As weird as that news might sound, it was music to the ears of some gamers — who have been trying and failing to get their hands on graphics cards for months due to the great GPU shortage, and blaming miners for part of that.

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Facebook will block Australian users and publishers from sharing news links in response to new bill

Facebook has decided to block both Australian users and media companies from sharing links to news articles and related content on its main social network, following the country’s proposed landmark regulatory measure that would force tech giants to pay Australian news organizations for using their content.

The bill passed the Australian House of Representatives today and is believed to have enough votes to pass the Senate, The New York Times reported. The bill also targets Google, which at one point last month threatened to leave the country entirely. However, Google has since decided to start cutting deals with major Australian media organizations, like Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp., to comply. Facebook, it appears, will not follow suit — for now.

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